What is GDPR?

If you're running a business that handles any sort of personal data, then chances are that you've heard of GDPR. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into effect on May 25, 2018, and it completely changed the way businesses must handle personal data. But what exactly is GDPR and how does it affect you and your business? In this article, we'll break down GDPR and give you everything you need to know to ensure compliance.

Understanding GDPR: A Brief Overview

GDPR, or General Data Protection Regulation, is a regulation that was created by the European Union (EU) to protect the personal data and privacy of EU citizens. The regulation applies to anyone who processes personal data of individuals within the EU, regardless of where the processing takes place. This means that companies located outside of the EU must also comply with GDPR if they process the personal data of EU citizens.

The goal of GDPR is to give individuals more control over their personal data and to give them the ability to know, access, and delete the personal data that companies have about them. This means that companies must clearly explain how they collect, store, and use personal data, and they must obtain explicit consent from individuals before collecting their data.

The Origins of GDPR

GDPR was officially adopted by the EU in April 2016, and it came into full effect two years later on May 25, 2018. But the origins of GDPR can be traced back to the 1995 Data Protection Directive. This directive was the first EU-wide legislation related to data protection, and it established the legal framework for data protection across the EU. However, as technology continued to advance, it became clear that the directive needed to be updated to reflect the modern digital world.

In 2012, the European Commission proposed a comprehensive reform of the EU's data protection rules to strengthen online privacy rights and boost Europe's digital economy. The proposal included the creation of a single set of rules for data protection across the EU, which eventually led to the adoption of GDPR.

The Purpose of GDPR

The primary purpose of GDPR is to protect the personal data of EU citizens. GDPR gives individuals more control over their personal data and requires companies to be more transparent about how they collect, store, and use personal data. Additionally, GDPR gives individuals the right to request access to their personal data, and it gives them the right to have their data deleted in certain circumstances.

Under GDPR, companies must also appoint a Data Protection Officer (DPO) if they process large amounts of personal data or sensitive personal data. The DPO is responsible for ensuring that the company complies with GDPR and for handling any data protection issues that arise.

Furthermore, GDPR requires companies to report any data breaches within 72 hours of discovery. This means that companies must have measures in place to detect and respond to data breaches quickly. Failure to comply with GDPR can result in significant fines of up to ���20 million or 4% of a company's global annual revenue, whichever is higher.

In conclusion, GDPR is an important regulation that aims to protect the personal data and privacy of EU citizens. It gives individuals more control over their personal data and requires companies to be more transparent about how they collect, store, and use personal data. Compliance with GDPR is essential for companies that process the personal data of EU citizens, and failure to comply can result in significant fines.

The Key Principles of GDPR

Lawfulness, Fairness, and Transparency

GDPR requires that personal data be collected and processed lawfully, fairly, and in a transparent manner. This means that companies must be clear about what data they are collecting and why they are collecting it. They must also obtain consent from individuals before collecting any personal data. This is to ensure that individuals are fully aware of what data is being collected about them and why, and that they have given their consent for their data to be used in this way.

Transparency is also key, as companies must be open and honest about how they collect and use personal data. They must provide individuals with clear and concise information about their data processing activities, including who they are sharing the data with, how long they will keep the data for, and what the individual's rights are in relation to their data.

Purpose Limitation

Companies may only collect and process personal data for specific, explicit, and legitimate purposes. They can only use the data for the purposes for which it was collected, and they cannot use it for other purposes without obtaining additional consent from the individual.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies do not collect more data than they need, and that they do not use the data in ways that individuals would not expect or find intrusive. It also means that companies must be clear about the purposes for which they are collecting data, and must not use the data for any other purposes without obtaining explicit consent from the individual.

Data Minimization

Companies may only collect and process personal data that is necessary for the specific purposes for which it is being collected. They must also ensure that the data is accurate and up-to-date.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies do not collect more data than they need, and that they only collect data that is relevant to the purposes for which it is being collected. It also means that companies must take steps to ensure that the data they collect is accurate and up-to-date, so that it can be relied upon for the purposes for which it is being used.

Accuracy

Companies must ensure that personal data is accurate, and they must take steps to correct any inaccuracies. They must also ensure that personal data is kept up-to-date.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies only use accurate data for their data processing activities. It also means that companies must take steps to correct any inaccuracies in the data, and must keep the data up-to-date so that it remains accurate and reliable.

Storage Limitation

Companies may only store personal data for as long as it is necessary for the specific purposes for which it was collected. They must also ensure that the data is stored securely.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies do not keep personal data for longer than is necessary, and that they only keep data that is relevant to the purposes for which it was collected. It also means that companies must take steps to ensure that the data is stored securely, so that it cannot be accessed or used by unauthorized individuals.

Integrity and Confidentiality

Companies must ensure that personal data is kept secure and confidential. They must take steps to protect personal data from unauthorized access, disclosure, or destruction.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies take appropriate measures to protect personal data from unauthorized access, disclosure, or destruction. This includes implementing appropriate technical and organizational measures to ensure the security of personal data, such as encryption, access controls, and regular backups.

Accountability

Companies are responsible for demonstrating that they are compliant with GDPR. They must keep records of their data processing activities and they must be able to demonstrate that they have taken appropriate measures to protect personal data.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies take their responsibilities under GDPR seriously, and that they are able to demonstrate that they are compliant with the regulation. This includes keeping records of all data processing activities, implementing appropriate technical and organizational measures to protect personal data, and providing individuals with information about their data processing activities and their rights under GDPR.

GDPR Compliance: Rights of Data Subjects

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a regulation in EU law on data protection and privacy for all individuals within the European Union (EU) and the European Economic Area (EEA). It has been enforced since May 2018, and it aims to give individuals more control over their personal data. One of the key features of GDPR is the rights of data subjects. Let's take a closer look at these rights.

Right to Be Informed

The right to be informed is one of the fundamental rights of data subjects. It means that individuals have the right to know what personal data companies are collecting about them, why it is being collected, and how it will be used. Companies must provide individuals with this information in a clear and concise manner. This right is important because it allows individuals to make informed decisions about how their personal data is being used.

Right of Access

The right of access is another important right of data subjects. It means that individuals have the right to access their personal data that is being held by companies. Companies must provide individuals with a copy of their personal data, free of charge, within one month of the request being made. This right is important because it allows individuals to check whether their personal data is being processed lawfully and fairly.

Right to Rectification

The right to rectification means that individuals have the right to have their personal data corrected if it is inaccurate or incomplete. Companies must respond to requests for rectification within one month. This right is important because it allows individuals to ensure that their personal data is accurate and up-to-date.

Right to Erasure

The right to erasure means that individuals have the right to have their personal data erased in certain circumstances, such as when the data is no longer necessary for the purposes for which it was collected, or when the individual withdraws their consent for the data to be processed. This right is important because it allows individuals to have control over their personal data and to request that it be deleted when it is no longer needed.

Right to Restrict Processing

The right to restrict processing means that individuals have the right to request that their personal data be processed only for certain purposes, or that it be stored but not processed further. Companies must respond to requests for restriction within one month. This right is important because it allows individuals to have more control over how their personal data is being used.

Right to Data Portability

The right to data portability means that individuals have the right to receive a copy of their personal data and to transmit that data to another controller, where technically feasible. This right applies only to personal data that has been provided by the individual and is being processed by automated means. This right is important because it allows individuals to move their personal data from one service provider to another.

Right to Object

The right to object means that individuals have the right to object to the processing of their personal data in certain circumstances, such as when the data is being processed for direct marketing purposes. This right is important because it allows individuals to have more control over how their personal data is being used.

Rights in Relation to Automated Decision-Making and Profiling

The rights in relation to automated decision-making and profiling mean that individuals have the right to object to decisions that are made about them based solely on automated processing, such as profiling. Companies must ensure that individuals have the right to human intervention in these situations. This right is important because it allows individuals to challenge decisions that are made about them without human intervention.

Conclusion

In conclusion, GDPR is a regulation that was created to protect the personal data and privacy of EU citizens. It gives individuals more control over their personal data and requires companies to be more transparent about how they collect, store, and use personal data. By understanding the key principles of GDPR and ensuring compliance with the regulation, businesses can protect themselves and their customers from data breaches and other privacy concerns.

What is GDPR?

If you're running a business that handles any sort of personal data, then chances are that you've heard of GDPR. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into effect on May 25, 2018, and it completely changed the way businesses must handle personal data. But what exactly is GDPR and how does it affect you and your business? In this article, we'll break down GDPR and give you everything you need to know to ensure compliance.

Understanding GDPR: A Brief Overview

GDPR, or General Data Protection Regulation, is a regulation that was created by the European Union (EU) to protect the personal data and privacy of EU citizens. The regulation applies to anyone who processes personal data of individuals within the EU, regardless of where the processing takes place. This means that companies located outside of the EU must also comply with GDPR if they process the personal data of EU citizens.

The goal of GDPR is to give individuals more control over their personal data and to give them the ability to know, access, and delete the personal data that companies have about them. This means that companies must clearly explain how they collect, store, and use personal data, and they must obtain explicit consent from individuals before collecting their data.

The Origins of GDPR

GDPR was officially adopted by the EU in April 2016, and it came into full effect two years later on May 25, 2018. But the origins of GDPR can be traced back to the 1995 Data Protection Directive. This directive was the first EU-wide legislation related to data protection, and it established the legal framework for data protection across the EU. However, as technology continued to advance, it became clear that the directive needed to be updated to reflect the modern digital world.

In 2012, the European Commission proposed a comprehensive reform of the EU's data protection rules to strengthen online privacy rights and boost Europe's digital economy. The proposal included the creation of a single set of rules for data protection across the EU, which eventually led to the adoption of GDPR.

The Purpose of GDPR

The primary purpose of GDPR is to protect the personal data of EU citizens. GDPR gives individuals more control over their personal data and requires companies to be more transparent about how they collect, store, and use personal data. Additionally, GDPR gives individuals the right to request access to their personal data, and it gives them the right to have their data deleted in certain circumstances.

Under GDPR, companies must also appoint a Data Protection Officer (DPO) if they process large amounts of personal data or sensitive personal data. The DPO is responsible for ensuring that the company complies with GDPR and for handling any data protection issues that arise.

Furthermore, GDPR requires companies to report any data breaches within 72 hours of discovery. This means that companies must have measures in place to detect and respond to data breaches quickly. Failure to comply with GDPR can result in significant fines of up to ���20 million or 4% of a company's global annual revenue, whichever is higher.

In conclusion, GDPR is an important regulation that aims to protect the personal data and privacy of EU citizens. It gives individuals more control over their personal data and requires companies to be more transparent about how they collect, store, and use personal data. Compliance with GDPR is essential for companies that process the personal data of EU citizens, and failure to comply can result in significant fines.

The Key Principles of GDPR

Lawfulness, Fairness, and Transparency

GDPR requires that personal data be collected and processed lawfully, fairly, and in a transparent manner. This means that companies must be clear about what data they are collecting and why they are collecting it. They must also obtain consent from individuals before collecting any personal data. This is to ensure that individuals are fully aware of what data is being collected about them and why, and that they have given their consent for their data to be used in this way.

Transparency is also key, as companies must be open and honest about how they collect and use personal data. They must provide individuals with clear and concise information about their data processing activities, including who they are sharing the data with, how long they will keep the data for, and what the individual's rights are in relation to their data.

Purpose Limitation

Companies may only collect and process personal data for specific, explicit, and legitimate purposes. They can only use the data for the purposes for which it was collected, and they cannot use it for other purposes without obtaining additional consent from the individual.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies do not collect more data than they need, and that they do not use the data in ways that individuals would not expect or find intrusive. It also means that companies must be clear about the purposes for which they are collecting data, and must not use the data for any other purposes without obtaining explicit consent from the individual.

Data Minimization

Companies may only collect and process personal data that is necessary for the specific purposes for which it is being collected. They must also ensure that the data is accurate and up-to-date.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies do not collect more data than they need, and that they only collect data that is relevant to the purposes for which it is being collected. It also means that companies must take steps to ensure that the data they collect is accurate and up-to-date, so that it can be relied upon for the purposes for which it is being used.

Accuracy

Companies must ensure that personal data is accurate, and they must take steps to correct any inaccuracies. They must also ensure that personal data is kept up-to-date.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies only use accurate data for their data processing activities. It also means that companies must take steps to correct any inaccuracies in the data, and must keep the data up-to-date so that it remains accurate and reliable.

Storage Limitation

Companies may only store personal data for as long as it is necessary for the specific purposes for which it was collected. They must also ensure that the data is stored securely.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies do not keep personal data for longer than is necessary, and that they only keep data that is relevant to the purposes for which it was collected. It also means that companies must take steps to ensure that the data is stored securely, so that it cannot be accessed or used by unauthorized individuals.

Integrity and Confidentiality

Companies must ensure that personal data is kept secure and confidential. They must take steps to protect personal data from unauthorized access, disclosure, or destruction.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies take appropriate measures to protect personal data from unauthorized access, disclosure, or destruction. This includes implementing appropriate technical and organizational measures to ensure the security of personal data, such as encryption, access controls, and regular backups.

Accountability

Companies are responsible for demonstrating that they are compliant with GDPR. They must keep records of their data processing activities and they must be able to demonstrate that they have taken appropriate measures to protect personal data.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies take their responsibilities under GDPR seriously, and that they are able to demonstrate that they are compliant with the regulation. This includes keeping records of all data processing activities, implementing appropriate technical and organizational measures to protect personal data, and providing individuals with information about their data processing activities and their rights under GDPR.

GDPR Compliance: Rights of Data Subjects

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a regulation in EU law on data protection and privacy for all individuals within the European Union (EU) and the European Economic Area (EEA). It has been enforced since May 2018, and it aims to give individuals more control over their personal data. One of the key features of GDPR is the rights of data subjects. Let's take a closer look at these rights.

Right to Be Informed

The right to be informed is one of the fundamental rights of data subjects. It means that individuals have the right to know what personal data companies are collecting about them, why it is being collected, and how it will be used. Companies must provide individuals with this information in a clear and concise manner. This right is important because it allows individuals to make informed decisions about how their personal data is being used.

Right of Access

The right of access is another important right of data subjects. It means that individuals have the right to access their personal data that is being held by companies. Companies must provide individuals with a copy of their personal data, free of charge, within one month of the request being made. This right is important because it allows individuals to check whether their personal data is being processed lawfully and fairly.

Right to Rectification

The right to rectification means that individuals have the right to have their personal data corrected if it is inaccurate or incomplete. Companies must respond to requests for rectification within one month. This right is important because it allows individuals to ensure that their personal data is accurate and up-to-date.

Right to Erasure

The right to erasure means that individuals have the right to have their personal data erased in certain circumstances, such as when the data is no longer necessary for the purposes for which it was collected, or when the individual withdraws their consent for the data to be processed. This right is important because it allows individuals to have control over their personal data and to request that it be deleted when it is no longer needed.

Right to Restrict Processing

The right to restrict processing means that individuals have the right to request that their personal data be processed only for certain purposes, or that it be stored but not processed further. Companies must respond to requests for restriction within one month. This right is important because it allows individuals to have more control over how their personal data is being used.

Right to Data Portability

The right to data portability means that individuals have the right to receive a copy of their personal data and to transmit that data to another controller, where technically feasible. This right applies only to personal data that has been provided by the individual and is being processed by automated means. This right is important because it allows individuals to move their personal data from one service provider to another.

Right to Object

The right to object means that individuals have the right to object to the processing of their personal data in certain circumstances, such as when the data is being processed for direct marketing purposes. This right is important because it allows individuals to have more control over how their personal data is being used.

Rights in Relation to Automated Decision-Making and Profiling

The rights in relation to automated decision-making and profiling mean that individuals have the right to object to decisions that are made about them based solely on automated processing, such as profiling. Companies must ensure that individuals have the right to human intervention in these situations. This right is important because it allows individuals to challenge decisions that are made about them without human intervention.

Conclusion

In conclusion, GDPR is a regulation that was created to protect the personal data and privacy of EU citizens. It gives individuals more control over their personal data and requires companies to be more transparent about how they collect, store, and use personal data. By understanding the key principles of GDPR and ensuring compliance with the regulation, businesses can protect themselves and their customers from data breaches and other privacy concerns.

What is GDPR?

If you're running a business that handles any sort of personal data, then chances are that you've heard of GDPR. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into effect on May 25, 2018, and it completely changed the way businesses must handle personal data. But what exactly is GDPR and how does it affect you and your business? In this article, we'll break down GDPR and give you everything you need to know to ensure compliance.

Understanding GDPR: A Brief Overview

GDPR, or General Data Protection Regulation, is a regulation that was created by the European Union (EU) to protect the personal data and privacy of EU citizens. The regulation applies to anyone who processes personal data of individuals within the EU, regardless of where the processing takes place. This means that companies located outside of the EU must also comply with GDPR if they process the personal data of EU citizens.

The goal of GDPR is to give individuals more control over their personal data and to give them the ability to know, access, and delete the personal data that companies have about them. This means that companies must clearly explain how they collect, store, and use personal data, and they must obtain explicit consent from individuals before collecting their data.

The Origins of GDPR

GDPR was officially adopted by the EU in April 2016, and it came into full effect two years later on May 25, 2018. But the origins of GDPR can be traced back to the 1995 Data Protection Directive. This directive was the first EU-wide legislation related to data protection, and it established the legal framework for data protection across the EU. However, as technology continued to advance, it became clear that the directive needed to be updated to reflect the modern digital world.

In 2012, the European Commission proposed a comprehensive reform of the EU's data protection rules to strengthen online privacy rights and boost Europe's digital economy. The proposal included the creation of a single set of rules for data protection across the EU, which eventually led to the adoption of GDPR.

The Purpose of GDPR

The primary purpose of GDPR is to protect the personal data of EU citizens. GDPR gives individuals more control over their personal data and requires companies to be more transparent about how they collect, store, and use personal data. Additionally, GDPR gives individuals the right to request access to their personal data, and it gives them the right to have their data deleted in certain circumstances.

Under GDPR, companies must also appoint a Data Protection Officer (DPO) if they process large amounts of personal data or sensitive personal data. The DPO is responsible for ensuring that the company complies with GDPR and for handling any data protection issues that arise.

Furthermore, GDPR requires companies to report any data breaches within 72 hours of discovery. This means that companies must have measures in place to detect and respond to data breaches quickly. Failure to comply with GDPR can result in significant fines of up to ���20 million or 4% of a company's global annual revenue, whichever is higher.

In conclusion, GDPR is an important regulation that aims to protect the personal data and privacy of EU citizens. It gives individuals more control over their personal data and requires companies to be more transparent about how they collect, store, and use personal data. Compliance with GDPR is essential for companies that process the personal data of EU citizens, and failure to comply can result in significant fines.

The Key Principles of GDPR

Lawfulness, Fairness, and Transparency

GDPR requires that personal data be collected and processed lawfully, fairly, and in a transparent manner. This means that companies must be clear about what data they are collecting and why they are collecting it. They must also obtain consent from individuals before collecting any personal data. This is to ensure that individuals are fully aware of what data is being collected about them and why, and that they have given their consent for their data to be used in this way.

Transparency is also key, as companies must be open and honest about how they collect and use personal data. They must provide individuals with clear and concise information about their data processing activities, including who they are sharing the data with, how long they will keep the data for, and what the individual's rights are in relation to their data.

Purpose Limitation

Companies may only collect and process personal data for specific, explicit, and legitimate purposes. They can only use the data for the purposes for which it was collected, and they cannot use it for other purposes without obtaining additional consent from the individual.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies do not collect more data than they need, and that they do not use the data in ways that individuals would not expect or find intrusive. It also means that companies must be clear about the purposes for which they are collecting data, and must not use the data for any other purposes without obtaining explicit consent from the individual.

Data Minimization

Companies may only collect and process personal data that is necessary for the specific purposes for which it is being collected. They must also ensure that the data is accurate and up-to-date.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies do not collect more data than they need, and that they only collect data that is relevant to the purposes for which it is being collected. It also means that companies must take steps to ensure that the data they collect is accurate and up-to-date, so that it can be relied upon for the purposes for which it is being used.

Accuracy

Companies must ensure that personal data is accurate, and they must take steps to correct any inaccuracies. They must also ensure that personal data is kept up-to-date.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies only use accurate data for their data processing activities. It also means that companies must take steps to correct any inaccuracies in the data, and must keep the data up-to-date so that it remains accurate and reliable.

Storage Limitation

Companies may only store personal data for as long as it is necessary for the specific purposes for which it was collected. They must also ensure that the data is stored securely.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies do not keep personal data for longer than is necessary, and that they only keep data that is relevant to the purposes for which it was collected. It also means that companies must take steps to ensure that the data is stored securely, so that it cannot be accessed or used by unauthorized individuals.

Integrity and Confidentiality

Companies must ensure that personal data is kept secure and confidential. They must take steps to protect personal data from unauthorized access, disclosure, or destruction.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies take appropriate measures to protect personal data from unauthorized access, disclosure, or destruction. This includes implementing appropriate technical and organizational measures to ensure the security of personal data, such as encryption, access controls, and regular backups.

Accountability

Companies are responsible for demonstrating that they are compliant with GDPR. They must keep records of their data processing activities and they must be able to demonstrate that they have taken appropriate measures to protect personal data.

This principle is designed to ensure that companies take their responsibilities under GDPR seriously, and that they are able to demonstrate that they are compliant with the regulation. This includes keeping records of all data processing activities, implementing appropriate technical and organizational measures to protect personal data, and providing individuals with information about their data processing activities and their rights under GDPR.

GDPR Compliance: Rights of Data Subjects

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a regulation in EU law on data protection and privacy for all individuals within the European Union (EU) and the European Economic Area (EEA). It has been enforced since May 2018, and it aims to give individuals more control over their personal data. One of the key features of GDPR is the rights of data subjects. Let's take a closer look at these rights.

Right to Be Informed

The right to be informed is one of the fundamental rights of data subjects. It means that individuals have the right to know what personal data companies are collecting about them, why it is being collected, and how it will be used. Companies must provide individuals with this information in a clear and concise manner. This right is important because it allows individuals to make informed decisions about how their personal data is being used.

Right of Access

The right of access is another important right of data subjects. It means that individuals have the right to access their personal data that is being held by companies. Companies must provide individuals with a copy of their personal data, free of charge, within one month of the request being made. This right is important because it allows individuals to check whether their personal data is being processed lawfully and fairly.

Right to Rectification

The right to rectification means that individuals have the right to have their personal data corrected if it is inaccurate or incomplete. Companies must respond to requests for rectification within one month. This right is important because it allows individuals to ensure that their personal data is accurate and up-to-date.

Right to Erasure

The right to erasure means that individuals have the right to have their personal data erased in certain circumstances, such as when the data is no longer necessary for the purposes for which it was collected, or when the individual withdraws their consent for the data to be processed. This right is important because it allows individuals to have control over their personal data and to request that it be deleted when it is no longer needed.

Right to Restrict Processing

The right to restrict processing means that individuals have the right to request that their personal data be processed only for certain purposes, or that it be stored but not processed further. Companies must respond to requests for restriction within one month. This right is important because it allows individuals to have more control over how their personal data is being used.

Right to Data Portability

The right to data portability means that individuals have the right to receive a copy of their personal data and to transmit that data to another controller, where technically feasible. This right applies only to personal data that has been provided by the individual and is being processed by automated means. This right is important because it allows individuals to move their personal data from one service provider to another.

Right to Object

The right to object means that individuals have the right to object to the processing of their personal data in certain circumstances, such as when the data is being processed for direct marketing purposes. This right is important because it allows individuals to have more control over how their personal data is being used.

Rights in Relation to Automated Decision-Making and Profiling

The rights in relation to automated decision-making and profiling mean that individuals have the right to object to decisions that are made about them based solely on automated processing, such as profiling. Companies must ensure that individuals have the right to human intervention in these situations. This right is important because it allows individuals to challenge decisions that are made about them without human intervention.

Conclusion

In conclusion, GDPR is a regulation that was created to protect the personal data and privacy of EU citizens. It gives individuals more control over their personal data and requires companies to be more transparent about how they collect, store, and use personal data. By understanding the key principles of GDPR and ensuring compliance with the regulation, businesses can protect themselves and their customers from data breaches and other privacy concerns.

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